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How to End a Relationship by Not Eating Grapes


I don't much like shopping.  Not for food, clothes, homewares, furniture, cars or houses. But give me a cause, a reason to think more deeply and then I become a passionate shopper.  The ultimate conscious consumer.

Being a conscious consumer is defined as having an increased awareness of the impact of purchasing decisions on the environment and on health and life in general.

It is of course a double-edged sword. No decision can be made on the spur of the moment, far too much thought needs to go into every purchase.  The joy, however, from having purchased an item that attains the level of accountability I demand is immense.

It started years ago with "buy Australian". Something which has turned into Australian made, Australian owned, Australian produce... oh and even if it is Australian I want it as local as possible.

I support brands, the ones that disappear one by one on our duopolies shelves, who look after the environment, who understand their supply chain.

Carbon neutral, eco-friendly, sustainable, deforestation, workers conditions in third world countries, culturally aware, natural fibres, low waste, free range, pole and line caught, against animal testing, the list goes on.

The downside to this obsession, the joy of conscious shopping, is that it is a nightmare for others to shop with me. Really, it's a stiff drink after experience, for most.  Ask my friends who left me in the juice isle of IGA when we were on holidays.  They finished all our shopping whilst I was choosing a juice which met my exacting standards.  I do think though, that shopping with me is an "educational experience".  The same gorgeous friends will now send me a photo of their purchases when shopping, just to let me know they are doing their bit.

It may have even ended a budding relationship.  I declared I couldn't eat grapes in winter to my new beau (no judgement if you do!), they weren't in season, and were only available because they were imported.  Alas, my phone went cold. My inability to eat an out of season fruit became the "Grapes of Wrath".

chemo@home tries whenever possible, to be a conscious consumer.  Hospitals and day-units have a huge carbon footprint.  They use lots of resources and produce lots of waste.  Our patients are also helping the environment by not driving their cars to the hospital or day-unit.  One nurse traveling to them, seeing 4-5 patients a day, instead of 4-5 patients traveling to the hospital. Saving fossil fuels, reducing pollution.

As for this little ole conscious consumer, I can't wait to discover the next brand that delights my senses by ticking all the boxes on my hefty list.

Julie

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